What the Flat-Earthers don’t know in the coming battle with the EPA

By / 31st December, 2010 / Climate change /No Comments
(Why pro-green folks will have their cake and eat it too.) 

With the initial phases of the new environmental regulations set to kick in, the flat-earthers are lining up to do battle. The plan is to emasculate the EPA with budget cuts that make enforcement increasingly difficult. Add to that the planned legal challenges by some states that will argue that the Feds and the Courts have no constitutional right to interfere with business…unless it’s to wave a legislative Pinocchio wand and turn a business into a real live person a la Citizens United.

Green advocates will have their hands full in 2011 when Michigan Republican Representative Fred Upton sits to chair the House Energy Committee.  The former believer in climate change underwent a conversion after getting a few checks from the petroleum industry. That plus Speaker Boenher’s implied threat of the loss of his committee chairmanship. After that, Upton became a flat earther as fast as you can say “winds gusts to 60.”

To be fair, Upton’s recent conversion to the flat-earther world view relies on his belief that tougher emissions regulations are also tough on the economy–the House’s first priority. But others disagree. This week Massachusetts announced a plan to curb heat-trapping gases emitted by homes, business and cars so that in ten years they will be 25% below 1990 levels.  What’ll that do to the state’s recovering economy? Only good according to Ian Bowels, the State’s Secretary of Energy and Environmental Affairs. Bowles says his studies show that emissions cuts will products a net gain in statewide jobs. Bowles further argues that, “People who have studied this find you can get your first 20-30 percent of greenhouse-gas cuts without making significant economic trade-offs.”

Consider Bowle’s comments in light of our recent blog on how vital the growing recycling industry is to the Commonwealth State and a light will go on. Going green has actually supported that state’s economy and it has grown jobs.

It means we can have our cake and eat it too. Not to mention save our bacon.


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